Monday, 2 February 2015

Never Truly Satisfied

Have you ever been satisfied with something that you’ve seen, heard or felt?

Have you well and truly accepted something as being exactly how you wanted it to be?

Have you truly felt that there was nothing more to be added or removed from the object of observation?

If you say yes, then I urge you to think again.

I’m not talking about things created by you but things you notice around you.

It is not possible that you agree with something as it is without thinking of at least one change that can be made to make the object better in some aspect. I’m not saying this, the philosopher Plato is.

This guy...
Image Courtesy: Google Images.

He says that there is an ‘ideal world’ somewhere with the perfect dimensions of everything we see, hear and smell around us. What we see in this world are just variations of the perfect things in the ideal world.

But we do manage to find some things perfect. It rarely happens, you must agree, but it does. But, is it really so? Do we really find perfection at all? Or do we compromise? Do we accept something close enough to our own idea of the ideal world to be perfect? Is it possible?

I may be treating this theory all wrong but it really brings me to the idea of dissatisfaction and the lack of perfection in our perception to the things around us.

In this imperfect world, does compromise rule our lives? Are we just content living with the discontent that comes with everything that doesn’t meet our standards? Are we so used to being dissatisfied that it has become the natural state of the human mind?

Elders teach us to be satisfied in what is there and others tell us to live in the moment, enjoy life as it is but if that is true, aren’t we actually living a lie?

It is true that we cannot have everything according to our own standards because if that could happen, chaos would run rampant in this world.

But then how do we become well and truly satisfied?

Can science answer that?

Can faith?

Can philosophy?


Well, I sure as hell cannot.